Reeves Watercolors – My Christmas Stocking Stuffer

My only explorations with watercolors before now have been via Derwent Inktense pencils or the Koi Watercolors Pocket Field Sketch Box, which has pans of paint. And really I’m such a beginner I don’t even know proper mixing or painting techniques yet anyways. But have slowly started researching tube paints for when I’m ready to make that next step up in my art supplies. But THEN, I opened up my Christmas stocking to discover some Reeves Watercolors tubes! Yes, I know enough from my research to realize that they are student-grade, economical entry-level paints, but I’m okay with that – I’m still learning the basics anyways! I can upgrade later once I make full use of these.

I received a limited palette of 9 colors: black, white, brown, red, green, blue and three yellows. So I started by making a color chart following the tutorial here. Using a sheet from my 9 x 6 discbound sketchbook, I decided to skip the black color to avoid a chart that was too dark, and just used the others. So created a table with 8 rows and 8 columns.

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It was a learning experience trying to determine the optimum amount of paint needed to mix the colors without wasting any. The resulting color chart I actually think is pretty ugly. A very 70’s mix of dark oranges, greens and browns. But this could just reflect my mixing inexperience too! So I will continue playing and try again in the future.

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5 thoughts on “Reeves Watercolors – My Christmas Stocking Stuffer

  1. […] was inspired recently by getting some tubes of Reeves Watercolor paint in my Christmas stocking to get out my Koi Watercolors Pocket Field Sketch Box, 24 Color Set and create a color chart. But […]

  2. redharparts December 28, 2014 at 8:47 am Reply

    In my world, Jane is the queen of mixing and charts…. see especially the links down the right side margin http://janeblundellart.blogspot.com/

    Also, most people quote their teachers saying, as mine did, to get the best quality you can afford. When learning, you’ll be less frustrated when using Artist grade paper, paint and brushes. I had that Koi kit and kicked to the curb after about 3 months. I like the configuration of the box but hated the quality of the paint. Daniel Smith, Windsor Newton, and some others are good to use.

    • pensandart December 28, 2014 at 5:25 pm Reply

      Yes, I have it on my list to get some Daniel Smith paints, maybe in 2015. But for now, the Reeves were a gift I will play around with. And I am actually enjoying the Koi kit. Maybe later when I am more experienced I will see the quality differences, but for now, they suit my purposes, and I love the vibrant colors. 🙂

  3. redharparts December 28, 2014 at 8:53 am Reply

    Reading through Jane’s post about how to re-fill half pans (which Is what I do), I found this in her answer to a comment:

    “For example, most student grade watercolours contain too much ‘filler’ to re-wet well. They may dry up and crack and fall out of the palette. To overcome this you can try adding a tiny drop of honey or glycerine to the colour well and stir it very well, or use Artist quality watercolours.

    In the Artist quality range, some brands re-wet better than others. Even within a brand some colours are better than others. One of the big reasons that I like Daniel Smith watercolours so much is that they dry and rewet well in the palette. Da Vinci does as well, in most colours. Some Winsor and Newton colours rewet well, but W&N recommend that you buy their pan colours for travel rather than using their differently formulated tube colours. The M. Graham colours are lovely but stay so wet that they are difficult to travel with, due to the honey in the formulation. Schmincke colours generally rewet well.”

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